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  #1  
Old 03-06-2006, 01:55 PM
socalta
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Default fuel lines

guys .. quick question on fuel lines. I thought I heard somewhere that one should use a specific type of braided line for use with fuel. Teflon or non-teflon.... I can't recall.

Also do you suggest using the hard lines with braided pieces spanning the difference ( I know braided are a must in the cab) or just running braided back to front?

I am about ready to weld the cage and mount the fuel cell and want to get a picture of the entire project.

thanks ....

Jorge
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Old 03-06-2006, 02:22 PM
jimwheeler jimwheeler is offline
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My first car had aluminum hard line, I think it was 3/8" from the fuel cel to electric pumps, to the fuel pressure regulator under the hood and aeroquip to the carb. It worked fine for 10 seasons and was very cheap. The new car has aeroquip the entire way from cel to carb. It was easier to install, but far from cheap. I just bought braided fuel line from the local speed shop. I think it is Teflon, but don't take that to the bank.
Wheel
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Old 03-06-2006, 02:31 PM
socalta
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Ok thanks wheel .. I think I will stick with the hard lines and bridge with braided ...

I am thinking now that the Teflon was not for brakes ... but I will ask before I buy ... need to measure and take inventory of what I need... nothing about this is cheap .. from the lines to the fittings..
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Old 03-06-2006, 03:03 PM
t4wallace t4wallace is offline
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As wheel said, braided = co$t.

The only thing that I highly recommend, but it's your call, is to get the lines inside the car. You might think they're routed out of harm's way and could "never" be punctured/damaged, but do you want to roll those dice?

Inside = braided.

My .02 regarding your high $$.

TW
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  #5  
Old 03-06-2006, 03:08 PM
socalta
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hmmm ..never thought about the hardlines inside ... I will price out new braided lines and go from there.

thanks tom .. wheel
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  #6  
Old 03-06-2006, 03:45 PM
jimwheeler jimwheeler is offline
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If you go with the hard line (and, by all means, run all the lines inside the car), you will need a flare tool. I just flared the aluminum line to match the AN fittings. Also remember to put the collar and the nut on before you do the flare, or you'll have to cut them off an do it again. Yes, that's what I did the first time. Any NAPA store can get the aluminum line for you, or get it from the speed shop. Cutting the aeroquip to avoid fraying the braided part, is a bitch, by the way. Tape and a fine hack saw or a hose cutting tool. (borrowed)
wheel
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  #7  
Old 03-06-2006, 03:52 PM
socalta
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thanks wheel .. I got the tools in my shop so I got that covered. I learned my lesson on putting the stuff on the line first when I mounted my proportioning valve.

When I worked for 7's Only out here, before they ripped me off, I did a bunch of braided lines so I am good on that part.

Part of me wants to save the money and go aluminium and part of me wants the ease of routing the braided lines. I remember however that they have a useful life of a few years before they should be changed ... not sure if its true or not ...
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  #8  
Old 03-06-2006, 05:00 PM
Mark Allen Mark Allen is offline
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Default Fuel lines

I'll echo the other guys. Whether you go with AL or braided definately route them inside the cab. I moved my braided line which was under the car 3 times over the years as I changed headers, torque arm, etc and finally moved the thing inside the cab and it was done forever. Well worth the effort. If you want to go with braided and still save some $$ I recommend using the Summit Aeroquip style fittings and the Summit hose. They are about 1/2 the price but I've never had a problem with them anywhere I've used them and they seem to install easier than the Aeroquip or Earl's version.

Mark
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Old 03-06-2006, 05:11 PM
socalta
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and would you look at that .. Summit catalog just arrived
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  #10  
Old 03-06-2006, 05:31 PM
BMiller
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I recommend braided all over. Much easier. The cost comes into play with the fittings more so than the hose. Minimize angle which minimizes cost and flow disturbances. I also route mine inside FWIW. Braided = no flaring and more adaptable to routing. Plus it looks so much nicer!
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